Thursday, April 17, 2014


PIX OF THE DAY


LET THE NUMBERS TALK

While parents may complain that kids are overworked, new research shows that the share of 17-year-olds with one to two hours of homework each night dropped from 27 percent in 1984 to 23 percent in 2012. The percentage of students who studied more than two hours a night remained unchanged at 13 percent.
USA Today

MEETING PROGRAM APRIL 17, 2014

Denmark Rotary Youth Exchange student Sophie M. shares her thoughts about her first eight months in the USA. (She likes it.) 

AROUND THE GLOBE


NO CHEESE FOR ME, OR YOU

Workers at a Russian cheese factory posed naked for a social media photo taking a joint bath in a vat of raw milk. “We support local business,” said one customer, “and they insult us like this by washing their filthy bodies in the food.”

CAN WE TALK? YES WE CAN!






ARE YOU HAPPY?

Want to be happy? Then consider moving to Provo-Orem, Utah. That community reported the highest level of well-being in the U.S. last year. The results from the latest Gallup survey, which rates the well-being of residents in 189 metropolitan areas, found people’s overall contentment to be higher in the Midwest and West and lower in the South. The Ashland-Huntington area, where Ohio, Kentucky, and West Virginia meet, came in last. The poll, now in its sixth year, is based on more than 500,000 interviews covering emotional and physical health, job satisfaction, safety, and access to food, shelter, and health care. “Our goal is to get leaders thinking about how they can enhance well-being,” Gallup director of client services Patrick Bogart tells USA Today. Different cities excelled in various categories. The San Francisco Bay Area led the way among metros with 1 million or more residents. Honolulu was best for emotional health. Michigan’s Holland–Grand Haven led the way for physical health and access to basic necessities, while Salinas, Calif., took the No. 1 slot for healthy behavior.
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TODAY IN HISTORY

April 17
858Benedict III ends his reign as Catholic Pope.
1492Christopher Columbus signs a contract with Spain to find a western route to the Indies.
1521Martin Luther is excommunicated from the Roman Catholic Church.
1524Present-day New York Harbor is discovered by Giovanni Verrazano.
1535Antonio Mendoza is appointed first viceroy of New Spain.
1758Frances Williams, the first African-American to graduate for a college in the western hemisphere, publishes a collection of Latin poems.
1808Bayonne Decree by Napoleon I of France orders seizure of U.S. ships.
1824Russia abandons all North American claims south of 54' 40'.
1861Virginia become eighth state to secede from the Union.
1864General Grant bans the trading of prisoners.
1865Mary Surratt is arrested as a conspirator in the Lincoln assassination.
1875The game "snooker" is invented by Sir Neville Chamberlain.
1895China and Japan sign peace treaty of Shimonoseki.
1929Baseball player Babe Ruth and Claire Hodgeson, a former member of the Ziegfield Follies, get married.
1946The last French troops leave Syria.
1947Jackie Robinson bunts for his first major league hit.
1961Some 1,400 Cuban exiles attack the Bay of Pigs in an attempt to overthrow Fidel Castro.
1964Jerrie Mock becomes first woman to fly solo around the world.
1969Sirhan Sirhan is convicted of assassinating Senator Robert F. Kennedy.
1970Apollo 13–originaly scheduled to land on the moon–lands back safely on Earth after an accident.
1975Khmer Rouge forces capture the capital of Cambodia, Phnom Penh.
1983In Warsaw, police rout 1,000 Solidarity supporters.
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AND I QUOTE


“It takes as much energy to wish as it does to plan.”
Eleanor Roosevelt

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

PIX OF THE DAY


SPACE

Saturn in Blue and Gold 
Image Credit: Cassini Imaging TeamSSIJPLESANASA
Explanation: Why is Saturn partly blue? The above picture of Saturn approximates what a human would see if hovering close to the giant ringed world. The above picture was taken in 2006 March by the robot Cassini spacecraft now orbiting Saturn. HereSaturn's majestic rings appear directly only as a thin vertical line. The rings show their complex structure in the dark shadows they create on the image left. Saturn's fountain moon Enceladus, only about 500 kilometers across, is seen as the bump in the plane of the rings. The northern hemisphere of Saturn can appear partly blue for the same reason that Earth's skies can appear blue -- molecules in the cloudless portions of both planet's atmospheres are better at scattering blue light than red. When looking deep into Saturn's clouds, however, the natural gold hue of Saturn's clouds becomes dominant. It is not known why southern Saturn does not show the same blue hue -- one hypothesis holds that clouds are higher there. It is also not known why Saturn's clouds are colored gold.