Thursday, May 31, 2012

ROTARY PROGRAM MAY 31, 2012

Representative of the East Alton (Illinois) school district talk about the Parent Education Program, focusing on the birth thru age three portion of the program.



UNTIL NEXT WEEK...




AND I QUOTE


"We all agree that your theory is crazy, but is it crazy enough?"
- Niels Bohr

TODAY IN HISTORY

MAY 31

 1962:Adolf Eichmann, one of the major Nazi orchestrators of the Holocaust, is hanged in Ramleh, Israel, after being convicted of 15 criminal charges, including crimes against humanity and crimes against the Jewish people. Eichmann is the only person ever to be executed by an Israeli civilian court.

1057: According to legend, Anglo-Saxon noblewoman Lady Godiva rides naked on horseback through Coventry, England, to protest the harsh taxes her husband Leofric had levied on the townspeople of Coventry.

1976: The Who perform the loudest concert recorded at the time, using 76,000 watts of power to perform a 120 decibel concert at Charlton Athletic Football Club Ground in London. The volume is enough to get them into the Guinness Book of World Records as "loudest pop group."

1927:After a production run of 15,007,003 vehicles, the last Ford Model T comes off the assembly line.

1859:Big Ben, the great bell in the clock tower at the Palace of Westminster in London, begins operating today

1977:The 800 mile long Alaska Pipeline is completed.
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Wednesday, May 30, 2012


HITTING THE ROAD-MONUMENT VALLEY, ARIZONA

WHO KNEW THAT THERE WAS A FACTORY?


MENSA Q & A

In Norse/Viking mythology, which god was always making trouble for the others?
(click below for the answer)

USING THE FLOOR IS ALWAYS AN OPTION





TODAY IN HISTORY

MAY 30

1868:At the insistence of Gen. John A. Logan, the United States celebratesMemorial Day for the first time. The holiday is originally known as Decoration Day, a reference to the decorated graves of fallen Civil Warsoldiers. Memorial Day is now a federal holiday on the last Monday in May, commemorating all men and women who gave their lives fighting in the United States Armed Forces.

1431: At age 19, French military heroine Joan of Arc is burned at the stake as a heretic in Rouen, France, having claimed that divine inspiration helped her lead her troops to victory in the Hundred Years’ War. She would be recognized as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church in 1920, with May 30 serving as her feast day.

1967: Motorcycle-riding daredevil Evel Knievel jumps over a row of 16 cars at Ascot Speedway in Gardena, Calif. — and lives to tell the tale.
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POLIO ERADICATION SHIFTS TO EMERGENCY MODE


Despite the dramatic drop in polio cases in the last year, the threat of continued transmission due to funding and immunization gaps has driven the Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) to launch the Global Polio Emergency Action Plan 2012-13. (click below to read more)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY PETER CARL FABERGE


Tuesday, May 29, 2012


PEOPLE BEING PEOPLE

-- Officials in Burnsville, Minn., have brought the full force of the law to bear upon Mitch Faber (who was arrested, forced to pay a high bail, and released under electronic monitoring and only on condition of drug testing), whom they have charged with the crime of not putting proper siding on his house. According to a March report on KSTP-TV, Faber said he started re-siding, but when the economy turned bad in 2008, he stopped, assuming that the worst he could eventually suffer would be a fine. [KSTP-TV (St. Paul), 3-23-2012]
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A MARRIAGE PROPOSAL THAT WOULD BE TOUGH TO TOP

SNAPSHOT


AS WE GATHER AROUND




BIKER ALERT-IF YOU WEAR A HELMET, SLOW DOWN

Bicycle helmet
Bicycle helmet (Photo credit: nvainio)

Men in Helmets: Study Suggests They Ride Faster

A study of first-time bicycle-helmet users published in the American Journal of Public Health found men who wore helmets bicycled significantly faster than men who didn't wear them, whereas helmets had no effect on women's biking speed. (click below to read more)

AND I QUOTE


"In science one tries to tell people, in such a way as to be understood by everyone, something that no one ever knew before. But in poetry, it's the exact opposite."- Paul Dirac

REUPPING WITH DOLLY

Rotary International and Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library have recently renewed their partnership to put books into the hands of children in communities both large and small all across the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom Since 2009, Rotary International has been working with the Imagination Library to promote early childhood reading. Through the Imagination Library program, a child receives an age-appropriate book each month until age five. Rotary clubs have teamed up with Dolly to bring books to children in more than 300 communities. In the video above, Dolly thanks Rotarians “for all you continue to do for my Imagination Library.” Read more about Rotary’s work with the Imagination Library in the March issue of The Rotarian. Dollywood Foundation President David Dotson also praised Rotary’s influence in his March blog post for Rotary Voices.
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TODAY IN HISTORY

MAY 29

1942:Bing Crosby records Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” for the soundtrack of the film Holiday Inn on Decca Records. To date, the holiday classic remains the best-selling single of all time.

1910: Aviator Glenn Curtiss wins $10,000 in a race sponsored by New York World editor Joseph Pulitzer, when he successfully pilots his Hudson Flyer aircraft from Albany, N.Y., to Manhattan. At the time, Curtiss’ 150-mile flight is the longest ever attempted in the United States and the first true long-distance flight. Curtiss also has the distinction of delivering the nation’s first airmail, as he carries a letter from Albany Mayor James McEwan to New York City Mayor William Gaynor.

2001: The U.S. Supreme Court rules that golfer Casey Martin may use a golf cart to travel between shots during PGA Tour events, under the provisions of the Americans With Disabilities Act, due to Martin’s disability — Klippel-TrĂ©naunay syndrome.

1886:The first advertisement for Coca-Cola is placed in the Atlanta Journal by Chemist John Pemberton
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Monday, May 28, 2012


WE REMEMBER

Memorial Day Commemoration 2008
Memorial Day Commemoration 2008 (Photo credit: davidyuweb)


"(A)s this day comes round we are in the presence of the dead... and on this day when we decorate their graves— the dead come back and live with us." 
—Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.
Memorial Day was first observed as Decoration Day to commemorate those who died in the War Between the States. It is a day set aside in deference to American Patriots who pledged and delivered their lives to support and defend the Rule of Law enshrined in our Constitution. Since our nation's founding, more than one million American Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coast Guardsmen have paid the ultimate price in defense of our nation, and it is their final sacrifice that we honor with solemn reverence.

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TIME TO DINE





EVERYONE LIKES CRISPY


An Accounting For Taste
Why does crispness appeal to palates around the world, whether the diners are crunching on Kentucky Fried Chicken or crickets?

Omnivorous Mind
By John S. Allen
(Harvard, 319 pages, $25.95)


Is there an instinct for food, some kernel of common taste hidden deep within the vast array of cuisines and food cultures? Does a "theory of food" guide our choice of foods, our idea of what counts as a full meal or a desirable snack? John S. Allen, a neuroanthropologist, thinks so, and in "The Omnivorous Mind" he explores our biological equipment for taste and the ways in which each culture builds a unique cuisine upon a shared cognitive blueprint. (click below to read more)

TAPPING INTO "TAPS"


A century and a half ago, two battle-weary Civil War soldiers wrote the famous bugle call.


Like many great American songs, "Taps" had two composers—one with musical chops, the other with a big idea. Fortunately for the bugle call's place in history, the musician let his more powerful collaborator spread the word, and the 24-note song survived and flourished. (click below to read more)

TODAY IN HISTORY

MAY 28

 1892:With 182 charter members and naturalist John Muir as its first president, the Sierra Club is founded in attorney Warren Olney's San Francisco office. From its early days, the Sierra Club has sought to encourage recreation, education and conservation in the Sierra Nevadas.


1957: The Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Giants are granted permission by Major League Baseball's National League to move to Los Angeles and San Francisco, respectively, leaving thousands of New York baseball fans heartbroken.


1997: Piloting a restored Lockheed Electra Model 10E, the same make and model of aircraft in which Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan disappeared 60 years earlier, Texas businesswoman and aviation enthusiast Linda Finch lands in Oakland, Calif., completing her re-creation of the around-the-world flight that Earhart attempted in 1937.

1971: USSR Mars 3 is launched and the first spacecraft to soft land on Mars.
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MENSA Q & A


Give the U.S. English translation for this British English term: Vest
(click below for the answer)

Sunday, May 27, 2012


WHEN DUTY CALLS


JUST FOR PUN


We are going on a class trip to the Coca-Cola factory. I hope there's no pop quiz.

DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME

HAS ANYONE SEEN OUR PRESIDENT?





A STEAK IS BORN

It's an un-obvious chunk of meat that has been sitting there — a little diamond surrounded by a bunch of coal," Steve Price told me. "I'd love to tell you more. We just can't."

Price works at Oklahoma State University. The school says it has worked with an outside meat expert to discover a new steak. It's hiding somewhere inside a part of a cow that's now commonly used for hamburger. (click below to read more)

TODAY IN HISTORY

The Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco, CA a...
The Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco, CA at sunset taken from the Marin Headlands (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
MAY 27

1967:With former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy and John F. Kennedy Jr. looking on, 9-year-old Caroline Kennedy christens the USS John F. Kennedy in honor of her father, two days before what would have been his 50th birthday. The ship is the last conventionally powered aircraft carrier commissioned by the U.S. Navy.

1937: Some 200,000 pedestrians walk across the Golden Gate Bridgewhen it is officially opened to foot traffic. Designed by chief engineer Joseph Strauss, the bridge spans about 1.7 miles to connect San Francisco with Marin County.

1995: Superman actor Christopher Reeve is paralyzed from the neck down after being thrown from his horse while jumping in an equestrian event in Culpeper, Va.

1997:The first all female relay team, 20 British women, reaches the North Pole in a challenging 620 mile trek.

1969:The construction of Walt Disney World begins

1936:Maiden voyage of the "RMS Queen Mary" ocean liner.

1703:St. Petersburg is founded by Peter the Great.
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AND I QUOTE


"In any contest between power and patience, bet on patience."
- W.B. Prescott